Daenerys, Bush and Missions Unaccomplished

George W Bush, the 43rd president of the United States, and Daenerys Targaryen, the dragon-taming heroine of George R.R. Martin’s immensely popular Game of Thrones series are not, on the face of it, very similar. But in the roles that they inherited and the tangles they found themselves in there are some uncanny similarities: they are both inheritors of grand dynasties – Daenerys of the mad king Targaryen, Bush of his namesake and father, George ‘no W’ Bush…

But I was thinking more in  terms of their politics and, depending on how things turn out in Martin’s series, the legacies they leave on their respective planets .

Bush is well known for his foreign policy adventurism in the Islamic world – his removal of the Taliban and Al-Qaida in Afghanistan and the toppling of Saddam Hussein in Iraq. Both actions were a response to the atrocity of 9/11, the first directly and the second more obliquely and controversially. But they were underpinned by the ideology of neo-conservatism. Neo-conservatives thought (and still think) that American military power should be used proactively to effect good in the world. They also thought that, once the bad guys were dispatched, the people of the Middle East would embrace democracy and human rights. Unfortunately, once the regimes fell, the countries fell into Islamic extremism and sectarian strife, with the US and her allies left unpopular policemen in the area fighting bitter guerrilla insurgencies, whose fighters could easily melt back into the civilian population and wait for the media to document US ‘atrocities.’ The administration’s single biggest mistake in Iraq sprung from their idealism: with the ideologue Donald Rumsfeld as US Secretary of Defence, the decision was made to disband the Iraqi police force and army, who, tainted though they were by association with Saddam, were the one force who could have quelled the disorder during the transition into the new era.

So much for Bush. Onto Daenerys. Having secured an impressive army in Qarth, the mother of dragons, makes her way through Slavers’ Bay. Somewhere along the way she decides that the immense power that she has won should be used to effect good in the world. Against the advice of some of her advisers, pragmatic types more worried about events in Westeros (the West, that is) than the lifves and liberties of those in the East, she decides to free the slaves of those cities. After the initial euphoria, things are not as easy as expected. Slavery, though evil, had given structure to those societies, and with nothing to take its place, people are lost and vulnerable. The fanatical ‘Sons of the Harpy’ fight a murderous insurgency and then melt into the civilian population, endlessly provoking Daenerys into making brutal reprisals. In the book, though not (yet?) in the series, a brutish former slave becomes a tin pot tyrant and leads an army to conquer Daenerys’ power base in Mereen – it seems many of the people she freed decide they quite like violence and servitude after all.

I don’t think Martin set out to comment on US policy; he just seems to have a grasp of the way that reality has a way of undermining idealism. To go by Bush’s experience, Daenerys will not have an easy time, though she seems at least to have a more pragmatic set of advisers.

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5 thoughts on “Daenerys, Bush and Missions Unaccomplished

    1. Nicely put – a ‘monopoly on violence’ (also, sounds like a great idea for a board game). I love the realpolitik in Martin’s work. As in the real world out there, nothing is easy, people don’t always do what you perceive to be in their best interests, and the most ruthless prevail. Thanks for the comment, anyway.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. It was a great article. I always enjoyed how Martin constructed his conflicts, so that they weren’t so clearly delineated between bad guys and good guys. We might choose how we want things to go, but there’d be a trade off at some level that we’d have to accept.

        Like Stannis’ potential victory at Blackwater might get rid of Joffrey (yay) but most likely would end with Tyrion’s death (boo)

        It’s always great to see people writing about Game of Thrones.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Glad you enjoyed the article, and glad to find your blog too… Funnily, I always found Stannis to be one of the most sympathetic characters in the series, despite the terrible things he does… so I agree that’s one of the most enjoyable aspects of the series – the fuzzy boundaries between good and bad guys. But, as your mention of Joffrey reminded me, there are also just some irredeemably evil people too… which is also true to life!

        Liked by 1 person

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